Northern Territory Flag

The Northern Territory Flag was designed by Mr Robert Ingpen, of Melbourne, who used a number of designs submitted by members of the public as the basis for his design. The new flag was finalised and used in ceremonies associated with the creation of the Northern Territory Government on the first day of Self Government, 1 July 1978.

Design

The Northern Territory Flag incorporates the three Territory colours, black white and red ochre and the Floral Emblem, Sturt’s Desert Rose. The stars on the black panel represent the five stars in the constellation of the Southern Cross.

The representation of Sturt’s Desert Rose on the red ochre panel shows seven petals with a seven pointed star in the centre, symbolising the six Australian States and the Northern Territory. The correct positioning of the star within the petals of the rose is with a central point of the star pointing downwards.

Colours

The official colours of the Northern Territory are black, white and red ochre (PMS 159).

Australian National Flag

Although the Northern Territory, like the States of Australia, has its own distinctive flag, the Australian National Flag takes precedence over all other flags.

Dignity of flags

It is undignified to use the Australian National Flag or the Northern Territory Flag in any of the following ways:

  • as a table or seat cover
  • as masking for boxes, barriers or intervening space between floor and ground level ona dais or platform
  • allowing it to fall or lie on the ground
  • as any part of a fancy dress costume

Use for advertising or commercial purposes

The Northern Territory Flag may be used for commercial purposes after receiving appropriate approval from the Chief Minister. Guidance on the appropriate use of the Flag in these circumstances may be obtained from the Director, Protocol Unit, Department of the Chief Minister.

Rules for flying the Australian National Flag and Northern Territory Flag

  1. The Australian National Flag takes precedence over all other flags.
  2. When displaying a flag outside a Northern Territory Government building with only one flagpole, the Northern Territory Flag should be flown.
  3. When a flag is to be flown outside other buildings with one flagpole, the choice between the Australian National Flag and the Northern Territory Flag is discretionary.
  4. Where Northern Territory Government buildings have two flagpoles, the Australian National Flag must be flown with the Northern Territory Flag.
  5. On other buildings with more than one flagpole, the Northern Territory Flag may be flown with the Australian National Flag.
  6. When displayed with the Northern Territory Flag, other state flags, house flags or club pennants, the Australian National Flag should be flown on the left of the observer facing the flag or at each end of a line of flags. If there are three flagpoles and the centre one is taller, the National Flag is in the centre, the Territory Flag on the left and the house flag or pennant on the right when the observer is facing the building.
  7. When the Australian National Flag, the Union Jack and the Northern Territory Flag are flown on or in front of a building they should be positioned with the Australian National Flag on the left, the Union Jack in the centre and the Northern Territory Flag on the right of the observer facing the building.
  8. When carried single file in a procession with state and club flags and pennants, the Australian National Flag should always lead.
  9. When carried in line and there is only one Australian National Flag it should be placed in the centre of the line.
  10. When the number of flags is even, the Australian National Flag cannot be placed in the centre, the flag should be carried in the right-hand end of the line (when facing the direction of movement).
  11. When an Australian National Flag is not used, but a Northern Territory Flag is flown, it would take the precedence afforded the National Flag in the above situations.

How to Display the Flag

The Australian National Flag and the Northern Territory Flag should be displayed as follows:

  • On a staff
  • On a flag rope (halyard)
  • Flat against a wall
  • Suspended vertically above the middle of a roadway
  • When either flag is used as a covering for a casket in a funeral ceremony, it is displayed with the top left quarter draped over the left shoulder of the deceased. The flag is always removed before burial.
  • The Australian National Flag and the Northern Territory Flag may be flown on all working days during normal working hours. They may be displayed at night but only when they are properly illuminated.

Unveiling Ceremonies

The Australian National Flag or the Northern Territory Flag should not be used as a covering for a statue, monument or plaque during an unveiling ceremony. The flags may be displayed as a distinctive feature of the ceremony if appropriate, either on a staff or flat against the wall alongside or behind the object of unveiling.

A plain cover should be used on the monument or plaque, etc to be unveiled.

Disposal of the Flag

When a flag becomes dilapidated and is no longer in a suitable condition for use, it should be destroyed in a dignified way by burning privately.

Days of National Commemoration

For days of National Commemoration that regularly fall on public holidays, the Australian National Flag will be flown from General Post Offices and other principal Commonwealth buildings in State capitals and Chief Post Offices in major country centres where the population exceeds 10,000. The Northern Territory Flag will be flown from major Northern Territory Government buildings that are manned.

On days of National Commemoration the Australian National Flag or the Northern Territory Flag may be flown on any additional flag staff on public buildings. The previously stated rule for flying of flags apply.

The following occasions which occur annually should be particularly noted:

  • 1 January Anniversary of the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia.
  • 26 January Australian Day
  • Second Monday in March Commonwealth Day
  • 25 April ANZAC Day (flags should be flown at half mast till noon, then at the peak until the close of office business for a normal working day).
  • June Official Birthday of the Sovereign (the actual date of the Sovereign’s official Birthday is proclaimed annually)
  • 1 July Northern Territory Day (anniversary of Self-Government in the Northern Territory – should be observed by flying the Northern Territory Flag where appropriate).
  • 24 October United Nations Day (UN Flag to be flown where possible).
  • 11 November Remembrance Day (flags should be flown at the peak from 8:00am to 10:30am, at half mast until 11:03am and then from the peak until close of business).

Half Mast for Mourning

The Australian National Flag and Northern Territory Flag may be flown at half mast as a sign of mourning. The flag is brought to the half mast position by first raising it to the top of the mast and then immediately lowering it slowly to the half mast position. The flag should again be raised to the top of the mast before being lowered for the day.

“Half mast” position is normally about one-third of the length of the pole from the top.

The Department of Special Minister of State in Canberra may direct the National Flag to be flown at half mast as a sign of mourning on the following occasions:

  • The death of a Sovereign, member of the royal Family or a Sovereign or Head of State of a foreign nation.
  • The death of a Governor-General
  • The death of a distinguished Australian Citizen
  • The death of a prominent local citizen of a State

Under similar circumstances, the Department of the Chief Minister may direct the Northern Territory Flag to be flown at half mast when appropriate.

Following are examples of normal procedure:

  • On death of a Sovereign from the time of the announcement of the death until (and including) the funeral. It is customary on the day when the Accession of the new Sovereign is proclaimed for flags to be raised to the top of the mast from 11:00am until the close of business.
  • On the death of a member of the Royal Family in accordance with special commands from the Sovereign and/or by direction of the appropriate department.
  • On the death of a prominent Australian citizen.
  • On the death of a foreign Sovereign or Head of Sate of a foreign country with which Australian has diplomatic relations, on the day of the funeral.
  • When town or city authorities wish to fly either flag at half mast a sign of mourning following the death of a local citizen, it would be appropriate to do so on the day of the funeral. Flags should be raised to the peak after the burial has taken place.
  • When a distinguished person’s body is laying in state in a building, the flag on that building should be flown at half mast and at the peak on other buildings. The flag should be raised to the peak after the body has been removed.